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20130801
20130831
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CSPAN 8
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traveled. no one ever complained and accused george bush of being a socialist, or all of these things. president, he is going to need a lot of security. racism. it is amazing. host: we do understand the point. anything about congressional travel? caller: i think there should he some kind of oversight, and i think there should be some limit. but i am more concerned with the lobbyists, like the code rs,s, -- koch brothe monsanto, and the other private citizens who want laws that protect them and allow them free rein. and: back to your oversight setting limits comments. should that apply to presidential travel as well? caller: he does have a lot of oversight already. all presidents have oversight. with theave to comply rules of congress. not just obama, but all presidents. cherry picking about who is the bad person and who is not is so suspicious. -- thoser those of its of us who have been in the business for some time, this is not the first time residential travel has been the focus of groups. stories about kennebunkport. why did bill clinton always go to martha's vineyard? priceey payi
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
for former president george w. bush after he underwent heart surgery. in an e-mail to supporters, the nrcc writes that the procedure went according to plan and bush is in good spirits. president george w. bush courageously defended our freedom and our country, and we are missing his days in office now more than ever. the mail also contains a link byking supporters to chip in donating money to help us send president bush a bouquet of bluebonnets, the texas state flower. also, this message from the kremlin. russian president vladimir putin today is wishing george w. bush a speedy recovery. speaking of former president, from a member of the washington post the fix -- it was 39 years ago today that richard nixon announced he would resign. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. suburb some sort of anti- person who thinks everybody needs to live in new york city. comingensitive to be across as a condo-dwelling elitist of some kind. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. undeniablewere so
on immigration. here is a preview of the event hosted last month at the george w. bush institute last month. these are just rough numbers, about a million new jobs in the state of texas in the last five years. roughly a million lost jobs in california. that is amazing. points is what we are seeing right now is one of the great wealth transfers in american history geographically from states like california that don't get it right, my home state of illinois that don't get it right and states that do get it right like texas. this is one reason to be bullish on the future of texas. the interesting thing is texas and california are the two highest immigration states. the tax system is a much better job of economically assimilating immigrants so they are successful here. tell a foreign more of a welfare invites immigrants and the welfare system at a much higher pace than texas does. people come to texas, in my opinion, for jobs. people come to california for welfare grade i think you see the differing economic outcomes as a result. texas is the model other states should be emulating. see that ent
friends. .hey were pretty frustrated they did not like george bush very much. they sure hated losing to him in 2004, even more than 2000. they did not quit. they took the house and the senate in 2006. they never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. always easier to say try it. usually that means we need to work harder at what we are doing. i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. took 16 years to get one old reagan -- to get ronald reagan. democracy is hard work. it is people going out and knocking on doors. is is people going out and voting. .ur system works it is hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. they are afraid of centralized power. they're going to make this very difficult to do. they're going to have this president for four years that selected this. there's no other system that is is as complex as ours to work and get things through. the founders but it was the best defense for liberty. out.large it has worked i believe that madison came back he would be very happy. sometimes they do. different point of view are s
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i experienced them. he did, too. it goes back to the thing we started with. this government is on -- out of control. it has been predicted by historians our republic would fail. the question is, how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we re-embraced the things that made america great? as i said earlier, we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a big difference. i worked every day -- > we are going to leave this -- i'm convinced the only way we do that is start reassessing real convention changes to the constitution that restore 0 federalism and a constitutional relationship republic. i think that's the way. you're frustrated. you ought to see me in washington. sk my staff. sk reply wife. i see two things. one, i seed constitution, and i see what's happening to it. then i see grown men and women that don't care. that's what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they ignore what the constitution says because it is better for their political care
because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. by me, i've worked every day trying to do things. that i'm convinced the only way we do that is the states exert their tenth amendment authority and start reassessing -- [applause] changes to the constitution that restore federalism and a constitutional republic. and so i think that's the way. you are frustrated. you ought to see me in washington. asked by staff. i want people -- ask my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see it into things. one is, i see the constitution and i see what's happening to it. a
think it is a war. had george w. bush ever done that, i think he would have been tried for impeachment, unilaterally suspended by the , and there is just a variety of issues. we have tension within the system, struggles, and this one is very serious. but there will be legal cases. bounceing to try and around a little bit, but we will get to everybody. >> thank you. little concerned to find out you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending was there with obamacare. [applause] this is not theoretical for me, because two weeks ago today, my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know what? that is the price i pay for the liberty of my children. we have limited options, thanks .o our government i understand that i pay for $1000 perverage, month or $2000 per month. arere individuals who responsible, and we will make that sacrifice for our child. this is appropriate. you need to represent us. [applause] >> a great question, and i appreciate it very much, and i do try to represent the people. tost of
the administration you work for and what you're responsible for. >> so i served under both terms of the george w. bush administration. was actually appointed by the transportation secretary norman mineta. as you may know, mr. mineta is a democrat served in the republican administration and r authoring and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency at the u.s. d.o.t. oversees a million daily shipments of has does materials by all modes of transportation, air, land, truck, sea, vessel. and even pipeline. >> so your current work with united transportation advisers, what is that? >> a consulting firm. i'm a lawyer, have a law practice and consulting practice. so we talk infrastructure projects, we talk transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> so one of y clients key stone xl? not. >> anybody supporting nosir. >> so as far as key stone xl is concerned, the position that you are taking through the advisers or anyone else, where do you stand on it or if it should be built? >> i've been monitoring this for several years
the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i went to kick off the panel with you. coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not be your traditional cyclical recovery. unless the mindset in washington changed, and there was a better understanding of the underlying dynamics, we risked getting stuck. in a keyword of unusually sluggish clerk -- growth, high on implement, that is when it materialized. concept of the economy stuck in second gear. let me push this analogy. it is not just stuck in second gear, it is being driven on a foggy road. there is some good news. we are doing better than others. europe was in reverse and just went to neutral. japan has been neutral for a long time and just jumps to first gear. we are d
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12